insights

We are life-long learners, and we have hand-picked these insights from other great women and men around the world who are kind enough to share their wisdom with others, to challenge those around to think differently and inspire to act!

 

EQUAL PAY SELF-TEST TOOL

If you are in HR and are curious about how you can figure out how your company performs on pay parity, we found this tool to be extremely interesting!

Logib has been developed by Swiss government and has received the 2018 UN Public Service Award. It's easy to use and is continuously developed and available for free.

Take the test

Find out whether an equal pay policy for men and women is respected in your company

 
 

WHO ARE WE HELPING?

Humans help each other all the time. So what’s wrong with helping?

Rethink how and who you help.

 

WHEN TO TAKE A STAND – AND WHEN TO LET IT GO

We live in a world that is divided by polarity; where women often are seen as either leaders or care-takers; assertive or emotional. But is our world or are we truly that simple?

This talks dares us to embrace our duality, where we can be both female and leaders, and how we need our allies to help us advocate on our behalf, even when it's inconvenient.

Source: TED

Duality is a state of having two parts, but not in diametrical opposition, in simultaneous existence.

 

FINDING SPONSOR

Great advice from Carla Harris on what a sponsor can do for you, and better yet how to approach a sponsor.

Source: TED

...you are not going to ascend in any organization without a sponsor.

 

IMPLICIT BIAS TEST

Start with finding out your implicit bias (Project Implicit)

Take the test

People don’t always say what’s on their minds.

 

COMFORTABLE BEING UNCOMFORTABLE

Luvvie Ajayi shares three questions to ask yourself if you're teetering on the edge of speaking up or quieting down.

Source: TED

Your silence serves no one...

 

LETTING GO

Refreshing talk from Chieh Huang on acknowledging that it's hard to let go of control and how critical it is to do so.

Source: TED

If we know that micromanagement isn’t really effective, why do we do it?